132: Vulnerable Young People and Their Experience of Online Risks

Adrienne Katz (Youthworks) and Dr Aiman El Asam (University of Kingston) (February 2018)

A summary of the results of a large scale questionnaire study exploring the digital lives of those who are vulnerable offline compared to those of young people with no difficulties, as well as the relationships between five types of vulnerability and four categories of online risk. Data were collected via the annual Cybersurvey conducted in schools in Suffolk. Responses were obtained from 2988 young people aged 10-16 using an online questionnaire. 

130: Ofcom Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes - Focus on Critical Understanding

Saville Rossiter-Base/Ofcom (May 2018)

A summary of the results of the Ofcom’s Children’s Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers, and with parents/carers of children aged 3-4 (N = 2065) conducted from April-June 2017). The report also draws on a complementary online study with 500 12-15 years olds conducted in June 2017.

129: Media Use and Attitudes - Focus on Online Risks and Parental Mediation

Saville Rossiter-Base/Ofcom (May 2018)

A summary of the results of the Ofcom’s Children’s Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers, and with parents/carers of children aged 3-4 (N = 2065) conducted from April-June 2017). The report also draws on a complementary online study with 500 12-15 years olds conducted in June 2017.

128: Embracing Powerlessness in Pursuit of Digital Resilience: Managing Cyber-Literacy in Professional Talk

Dr Simon P Hammond and Professor Neil Cooper (Centre for Research on the Child and Family, University of East Anglia) (May 2018)

A summary of the results of a 4-year long Digital Life Story Work programme exploring how everyday conversations in children’s residential care homes foreground institutional concerns regarding online risks and adolescent vulnerability. Ten adolescents (six males and four females, mean age 15 years, age range 14-18 years) and thirty-five residential social care professionals from across four homes were recruited. Multiple qualitative data collection methods were used (e.g., reflective fieldnotes from observations and transcripts from conversations during observations, focus groups, semi-structured interviews and in-situ recordings of conversations stimulated by adolescents’ use of their social media accounts).  

127: Social Media, Social Capital and Adolescents Living in State Care: A Multi-Perspective and Multi-Method Qualitative Study

Dr Simon P Hammond, Professor Neil Cooper and Mr Peter Jordan (Centre for Research on the Child and Family, University of East Anglia) (May 2018)

A summary of the results of a 4-year long Digital Life Story Work programme exploring how adolescents in residential care settings use digital technologies to reflect on their lived experiences. Ten adolescents (six males and four females, mean age 15 years, age range 14-18 years) and thirty-five residential social care professionals from across four homes were recruited. Multiple qualitative data collection methods were used (e.g., reflective fieldnotes from observations and transcripts from conversations during observations, focus groups, semi-structured interviews and in-situ recordings of conversations stimulated by adolescents’ use of their social media accounts). 

126: Project deSHAME: Young People’s Experiences of Online Sexual Harassment

Maithreyi Rajeshkumar (Childnet) and Jo Bryce (University of Central Lancashire) (March 2018)

A summary of a large scale study examining young people’s experiences of peer-related online sexual harassment in Denmark, Hungary and the UK. 3,257 young people aged 13-17 years in the UK (n=1,559), Denmark (n=915) and Hungary (n=783) completed an online questionnaire. 107 young people aged 13-17 years also took part in focus groups in the UK (n=39), Denmark (n=29) and Hungary (n=39) addressing this issue.

 

125: Safer Internet Day 2018 - Digital Friendships: The Role of Technology in Young People’s Relationships

Maithreyi Rajeshkumar and Chris Heal (UK Safer Internet Centre) (February 2018)

A summary of a large scale study examining the role of technology in young people’s relationships, the impact of this on their wellbeing, and how they want the adults in their lives to support them. The survey was conducted online by Censuswide between 15-18th December 2017 with a representative sample of 2000 young people aged 8-17 years old in the United Kingdom.

123: Does Young People’s Tendency to Experience Risks Reach Across the Online/Offline Divide?

Dr Anke Görzig and the EU Kids Online UK Team (LSE) (January 2018) 

A summary of the results of a large scale study examining whether online and offline risk experiences: a) are behaviourally distinct, b) share the same common underlying propensity to experience risks, or c) both – show a mixture of joint and distinct properties. Data came from the LSE EU Kids Online study (www.eukidsonline.net), a random sample of 25,000 Internet-using children aged 9-16 across 25 European countries. For ethical reasons answers from 11-16 year olds only were used for this study, resulting in a sample of 19,406 (50% girls).

120: Digital Monitoring Behaviours from a Social Learning Perspective

Joris Van Ouytsel, Koen Ponnet and Michel Walrave (Nov 2017)

A summary of the results of a study investigating the extent to which perceived social norms about cyber dating abuse, witnessing controlling behaviour among parents, and the endorsement of gender stereotypes are linked with adolescents’ engagement in digital controlling behaviours. The study sample consisted of 1187 students (61.3% girls, n = 728) from 7 secondary schools in Flanders, Belgium. The study reports on a subsample of 466 students (71.0% girls) who were in “a romantic relationship with someone or had a romantic partner” at the time that the study was conducted.

119: Adolescents’ Perceptions of the Applications Used, Motives For, and Consequences of Sexting

Joris Van Ouytsel, Ellen Van Gool, Michel Walrave, Koen Ponnet and Emilie Peeters (Nov 2017)

A summary of the results of a study examining high school students’ perceptions of sexting behaviour. 57 adolescents (66.67% females) participated in 11 focus groups examining the role of digital media within romantic relationships. The focus group interviews were conducted between March and May 2015. Each focus group included 3-8 participants between 15 and 18 years old.