122: Maximising Opportunities and Minimising Risks for Children Online: The Role of Digital Skills in Emerging Strategies of Parental Mediation

Sonia Livingstone, Kjartan Ólafsson, Ellen Helsper, Francisco Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Giuseppe Veltri and Frans Folkvord (Nov 2017)

A summary of the results of a large-scale survey exploring parental beliefs, concerns and actions in relation to parent and child online skills, risks and opportunities, and parental mediation. The survey questioned European parents aged 25-65 with children aged 6-14 living in their household and under their responsibility or care in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Poland, Italy, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. 800 interviews were conducted per country (N=6,400). Quota sampling was used with random sampling within age quotas (25-34, 35-49, and 50-64) to ensure a representative sample.

117: House of Lords: Growing Up with the Internet

House of Lords (Nov 2017)

A summary of the key findings and recommendations of the inquiry by the House of Lords’ Select Committee on Communications during 2016-17. It considered what skills children might need and the impact of the internet on children’s development, wellbeing and mental health. It also examined the rights children enjoy online, and what impediments there are to these. Evidence was gathered by a public call for evidence (written and oral), consulting a broad group of stakeholders and the views of young people.

116: Children’s Online Activities, Risks and Safety: A Literature Review by the UKCCIS Evidence Group

Professor Sonia Livingstone, Professor Julia Davidson and Dr Jo Bryce, with Saqba Batool, Ciaran Haughton, Anulekha Nandi, and the UKCCIS Evidence Group (Nov 2017)

A summary of the main findings of a literature review identifying trends, recent developments and emerging issues related to online risk of harm to children. The report examines implications for safety policy and practice using key results of recent qualitative and quantitative research. The review drew on the UKCCIS Research Highlights Series and the research reports they summarise, a call for evidence circulated during February 2017 to UKCCIS members and other experts, keyword searches of academic and grey literatures, as well as research reports and publications already known to the authors.

107: Ofcom Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes - Focus on Critical Understanding, Attitudes & Parental Controls

Ofcom (Nov 2016) 

A summary of the results of the Ofcom Children’s Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers, and with parents/carers of children aged 3-4. A sample of 2,059 parents and children were interviewed between April and June 2016. This Research highlights presents results related to children’s critical understanding, attitudes and parental mediation.

102: Families and Screen Time: Current Advice and Emerging Research

LSE Media Policy Project (Nov 2016) 

This report reviews the academic literature on ‘parental mediation’, highlighting findings on ‘what is effective’ in parental efforts to minimise risk and maximise opportunity, and maps out prominent sources of advice for parents. It also draws on Parenting for a Digital Future, which conducted in-depth interviews with 65 families about their digital media practices, combining observations, fieldwork visits to digital media sites, schools and other relevant locations, as well as analysis of digital media texts produced by parents or children.

93: Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes – Parental Concerns and Mediation

Ofcom (November 2015) 
A summary of the results of Ofcom Children’s Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers and with parents of children aged 3-4. From April to June 2015, 1,379 in-home interviews with parents and children aged 5-15 were conducted, along with 688 interviews with parents of children aged 3-4. This Research Highlight presents the results from the report which relate to the analysis of data on parental concerns and mediation. 

89: How Parents of Young Children Manage Digital Devices at Home

EU Kids Online, LSE (November 2015)
A summary of the results of the re-analysis of the qualitative research study conducted with the families of young children aged 0-8 years across seven European countries (N = 70) which examined parental management of digital devices at home.

85: Children’s Media Lives: Year 1 Findings - Online Safety, Family Dynamics, Parental Concerns and Mediation

ESRO/Ofcom (October 2015)
A summary of the results of Ofcom Children’s Media Lives Year 1 Study. This is a small-scale, qualitative study which complements Ofcom’s quantitative media literacy surveys. It tracks the same 18 children aged 8-15 over a 3 year period in order to provide an in-depth understanding of how this sample of children are thinking about and using digital media. The first of three waves of ethnographic research was conducted in autumn 2014. This Research Highlights presents a summary of the results of the study in relation to online safety, family dynamics, parental concerns and mediation. 

83: Net Children Go Mobile: UK Qualitative Research Results

Net Children Go Mobile (July 2015) 
A summary of the UK results of a larger scale European qualitative study of the perceptions and perspectives of parents, teachers and children regarding children’s use of smartphones and tablets. 19 boys and 19 girls aged 9-16 took part in the research, either in single sex focus groups in schools, individual interviews in schools, and interviews with individuals or single sex pairs in homes. 3 focus groups (N = 17) with parents of children aged 11-17 were conducted, as well as 2 individual parental interviews. 2 focus groups (N = 13) with teachers and 1 (N = 4) with others working with children were also undertaken. Data collection occurred between January and September 2014.

82: Net Children Go Mobile: European Qualitative Research Results

Net Children Go Mobile (July 2015)
A summary of a large scale European qualitative study of the perceptions and perspectives of children, parents, teachers and others working with young people regarding the adoption, use, opportunities and risks associated with use of smartphones and tablets. Data were collected in nine European countries (e.g., Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Romania, Spain, UK). 55 focus groups (N = 219) and 107 interviews (N = 108) were conducted with children aged 9-16, and 40 focus groups (N = 180) and 44 interviews (N = 50) were conducted with adults across the nine countries. Children were recruited through at least 3 different schools and youth centres, and adults through schools, parent / teacher organisations etc. Data collection occurred between January and September 2014.