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Safer Internet Centre

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Research Highlight Series

125: Safer Internet Day 2018 - Digital Friendships: The Role of Technology in Young People’s Relationships

Maithreyi Rajeshkumar and Chris Heal (UK Safer Internet Centre) (February 2018)

A summary of a large scale study examining the role of technology in young people’s relationships, the impact of this on their wellbeing, and how they want the adults in their lives to support them. The survey was conducted online by Censuswide between 15-18th December 2017 with a representative sample of 2000 young people aged 8-17 years old in the United Kingdom.

124: Offence Processes of Online Sexual Grooming and Abuse of Children Via Internet Communication Platforms

Dr Juliane Kloess (University of Birmingham), Dr Catherine Hamilton-Giachritsis (University of Bath), and Professor Anthony R. Beech (University of Birmingham) (July 2017)

A summary of the results of a qualitative study examining the context in which sexual grooming occurs as part of sexually exploitative interactions with young people online. A five case series, comprising 29 transcripts of 22 interactions, were analysed using thematic analysis. These were identified and selected by the police forces involved based on meeting the criteria of the offender having committed (a) an offence of sexual grooming under Section 15 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (Home Office, 2003), or (b) any other offence under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 that included sexual grooming. 

123: Does Young People’s Tendency to Experience Risks Reach Across the Online/Offline Divide?

Dr Anke Görzig and the EU Kids Online UK Team (LSE) (January 2018) 

A summary of the results of a large scale study examining whether online and offline risk experiences: a) are behaviourally distinct, b) share the same common underlying propensity to experience risks, or c) both – show a mixture of joint and distinct properties. Data came from the LSE EU Kids Online study (www.eukidsonline.net), a random sample of 25,000 Internet-using children aged 9-16 across 25 European countries. For ethical reasons answers from 11-16 year olds only were used for this study, resulting in a sample of 19,406 (50% girls).

122: Maximising Opportunities and Minimising Risks for Children Online: The Role of Digital Skills in Emerging Strategies of Parental Mediation

Sonia Livingstone, Kjartan Ólafsson, Ellen Helsper, Francisco Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Giuseppe Veltri and Frans Folkvord (Nov 2017)

A summary of the results of a large-scale survey exploring parental beliefs, concerns and actions in relation to parent and child online skills, risks and opportunities, and parental mediation. The survey questioned European parents aged 25-65 with children aged 6-14 living in their household and under their responsibility or care in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Poland, Italy, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. 800 interviews were conducted per country (N=6,400). Quota sampling was used with random sampling within age quotas (25-34, 35-49, and 50-64) to ensure a representative sample.

121: ‘Sharenting’, Parent Blogging, and the Boundaries of the Digital Self

Professor Sonia Livingstone and Dr Alicia Blum Ross (Nov 2017)

A summary of research examining how parent bloggers represent themselves as parents and the implications for those drawn into these representations (e.g., their children). The study conducted interviews with 17 parent bloggers, 13 identified as White and the remaining four as Asian, British Asian, or mixed race. Most had young children from toddlers through primary school age, and four had children with special educational needs and disabilities. Five of the 17 bloggers were fathers

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